Case Results for Vehicle Seizures

We represent clients after their vehicle is seized for civil asset forfeiture proceedings in Florida and across the county.

When someone calls our office for a consultation, they often ask, “What kinds of civil asset forfeiture cases involving vehicles have you taken in the past, and what was the outcome?” To answer that question, we maintain this list. If you would like to view the case results listed below, then you should read the following disclaimer:

  • The Florida Bar does not approve or routinely review case results posted by attorneys.
  • The facts and circumstances of your case may differ from the facts and circumstances discussed here.
  • Not all case results are listed here or provided.
  • The case results discussed here do not necessarily represent the results obtained in all cases.
  • Each case is different and must be evaluated and handled on its own merit.

Click here to read more about case results for seizures of cash or cryptocurrency for forfeiture.


Seizure of Land Rover Defenders by CBP in Jacksonville

In August of 2022, a 1991 Land Rover Defender, a 1993 Land Rover Defender, and a 1994 Land Rover Defender were seized in Jacksonville, Florida, by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). We filed a claim for court action along with the cost bond. After negotiations back and forth, the Assistant United States Attorney (AUSA) told CBP he would decline to file any court action and instructed CBP to return the vehicles. CBP’s “notice of seizure” claimed that the vehicles were subject to forfeiture under the provisions of 19 USC 1595a(c)(2)(A), 49 USC 30112 – National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Authorization Act/Prohibition on Import and 19 USC J627a(a)(2), 19 USC 1627a(a)(l)(B), 19 US  1627a(c)(1)- Import of Self-Propelled Vehicles and/or Vehicle Parts With Tampered/Altered Identification Number.

Seizure of 2021 Cadillac Escalade by CBP in Jacksonville

in February of 2023, a 2021 Cadillac Escalade was seized in Jacksonville, Florida, by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). CBP claimed that the vehicle was subject to forfeiture under the provisions of 19 USC 1595a(d), 18 USC 544 – Property Used to Facilitate the Exportation Contrary to Law. On behalf of the broker, we filed a claim for court action with CBP and posted the cost bond. After reviewing the matter, CBP decided to release the vehicle, along with the check for the cost bond, and waived all storage fees.

Seizures of Vehicles at Border Patrol Stations

In June of 2022, a 2021 Ford Expedition was seized by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) at the Border Patrol Station in Carrizo Springs, Texas. CPB seized the vehicle claiming that it was subject to forfeiture under the provisions of 8 USC 1324(b)(1), 8 USC 1324(a)(1)(A)(ii) for Transportation of Aliens Within the United States. On behalf of the client, we filed a claim for court action with CBP. A month after the claim for court action was filed with CBP, the vehicle was released to the client.

In June of 2022, a 2012 Honda Pilot was seized by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) at the Border Patrol Station in Eagle Pass South, Texas. CBP claimed that the vehicle was subject to forfeiture under the provisions of 8 USC 1324(b)(1), 8 USC 1324(a)(1)(A)(ii) for the Transportation of Aliens Within the United States. Within two months of filing a claim for court action on behalf of the client, CBP agreed to release the vehicle.

Seizure of Vehicle for Forfeiture by the Fort Myers Police Department

In January of 2023, a 2017 Chevrolet Corvette was seized by the Fort Myers Police Department in Fort Myers, Florida, during a routine traffic stop. On behalf of the client, we filed a Demand for Adversarial Preliminary Hearing (APH) with the Fort Myers Police Department and requested the officers’ body-worn camera footage. After filing the APH, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) adopted the forfeiture claiming that the vehicle was subject to forfeiture under the provisions of 18 USC 981(a)(l)(A), 18 USC 1956(c)(7)(A), 18 USC 1961(1)(D), 21 USC 841 – Manufacturing, Distributing or Dispensing Controlled Substances. When the AUSA refused to file the complaint in federal court, CBP was forced to return the vehicle to the client and waived any towing or storage fees.

Seizure of Vehicle for Forfeiture by the Tampa Police Department

In December of 2022, a 2020 Toyota Supra was seized by the Tampa Police Department for forfeiture under the Florida Contraband Forfeiture Act. We filed a Demand for Adversarial Preliminary Hearing (APH) with the Tampa Police Department. Within thirteen (13) days of the vehicle being seized, it was released to the client. The Tampa Police waived the storage fees as well.

In June of 2022, the Tampa Police Department seized a 2022 Genesis SUV, claiming that the forfeiture was in violation of the Florida Contraband Forfeiture Act. We filed a Demand for Adversarial Preliminary Hearing (APH) with the Tampa Police Department. Within twelve (12) days of the seizure, the Tampa Police Department agreed to return the vehicle and waived the towing and storage fees.

Seizure of Vehicle for Forfeiture by the Hollywood Police Department

In September of 2023, a 2020 Dodge Challenger was seized by the Hollywood Police Department in Hollywood, Florida. The Hollywood Police Department claimed that the vehicle was stolen and the title was altered. We filed a Demand for Adversarial Preliminary Hearing (APH) with the Hollywood Police Department within the fifteen (15) day requirement and with the Circuit Cout for Broward County, Florida, on behalf of the client. The agency attorney called the seizing officer to testify during the Adversarial Preliminary Hearing (APH). After hearing testimony and the attorneys’ arguments, the Court ordered that the vehicle be released without towing or storage fees. Because the Court found no probable cause to seize the vehicle, the Hollywood Police Department was also ordered to pay $2,000 of our client’s attorney fees.


This article was last updated on Friday, March 28, 2024.